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Ashbourne Conservation Area

The fundamental characteristics of Ashbourne Conservation Area are its wealth of historic buildings and the quality of its architectural detail.

The character of the town is predominantly Georgian but with remnants of its Mediaeval past, evident in buildings around the Market as well as in the burgage plots to many of the buildings along Church Street and St. John Street. 

There are examples of Victorian properties of note on the periphery of the town.  Intrinsic historic details remain which demonstrate the nostalgia of earlier ages, notably Victorian shop fronts, decorative iron work, such as railings, boot scrapers and lanterns and the history and social status of the town can still be observed.

Set in the base of the valley following the Henmore Brook, there are panoramic views from higher vantage points, short range views across the town and coupled with these, glimpses into the 'secret' and often unnoticed passages and gennels, many leading to rear yards and which have developed over the centuries as the town expanded.

Ashbourne Conservation Area is predominantly an urban area, the boundary of which encompasses the town centre extending from the meadows beyond St. Oswald's Church in the west to Hall Lane and Park Road in the east.

The northern boundary is formed along Belle Vue Road, Union Street and part of Buxton Road and to the south the Conservation Area boundary predominantly follows the Henmore Brook and the rear of the gardens to buildings which face onto St. John Street.

The original designation of Ashbourne Conservation Area was in November 1968.  It was further extended in March 1972 and January 1979. The boundary was further amended in May 2008 and subsequently approved following a review in the Conservation Area Appraisal. It currently comprises 22.10 hectares.

Historic Assets

Within Ashbourne Conservation Area there are 710 buildings, of which 146 are listed entries (around 185 structures) and of these, 11 are Grade I or Grade II*.  The listed buildings in Ashbourne range from high status town houses, to smaller vernacular buildings, - from milestones to telephone boxes and even areas of paving. All are recognised for the contribution they make both individually and visually within the street-scene.

Ashbourne Conservation Area contains no Scheduled Monuments.

Conservation Area Character Appraisal

In May 2008 a comprehensive Conservation Area Character Appraisal was approved, which assessed the special qualities of the character and appearance of Ashbourne Conservation Area, both in terms of its buildings and the relationship of its spaces alongside those buildings.  It assessed the archaeology; origins and development of the area; the architectural and historic quality; the setting and landscape of the area; an analysis of the character and considered the negative and neutral factors which impact on the Conservation Area.  It also included a surface audit, of existing modern and historic surfacing throughout the area. Coupled with this, the document made reference to planning policies and strategies that work to enhance and preserve the special character and appearance of the area. As part of the Appraisal, alterations to the boundary were proposed and subsequently approved.

Buildings at Risk

Three of the listed buildings within the Ashbourne Conservation Area are recognised by the District Council as being 'at risk' – The Mansion House on Church Street (Grade I), The Former Malthouse to the rear of 23 Church Street (Grade II) and the Summer House on Belle Vue Road (Grade II).

Article 4 Direction

There are no additional planning controls, such as an Article 4 Direction, on properties in Ashbourne Conservation Area.

Documents

Ashbourne Conservation Area Map (PDF 1006KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 00 - Front Cover, Contents and Summary (PDF 1694KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 01 - Ashbourne in Context (PDF 1650KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 02 - Architectural Significance (PDF 2223KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 03 - Origins and Development (PDF 3129KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 04 - Architectural and Historic Quality - Part 1 (PDF 1843KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 04 - Architectural and Historic Quality - Part 2 (PDF 472KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 04 - Architectural and Historic Quality - Part 3 (PDF 1749KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 04 - Architectural and Historic Quality - Part 4 (PDF 1776KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 04 - Architectural and Historic Quality - Part 5 (PDF 3314KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 05 - Settings (PDF 4246KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 06 - Landscape Appraisal (PDF 3470KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 07 - Analysis of Character - Part 1 (PDF 1595KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 07 - Analysis of Character - Part 2 (PDF 3055KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 07 - Analysis of Character - Part 3 (PDF 3796KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 07 - Analysis of Character - Part 4 (PDF 702KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 08 - Negative Elements - Part 1 (PDF 3723KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 08 - Negative Elements - Part 2 (PDF 3060KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 09 - Neutral Elements (PDF 2628KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 10 - Justification (PDF 2627KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 11 - Conservation Policies (PDF 149KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - 12 - Appendix (PDF 2492KB)

Ashbourne Conservation Area Appraisal - Committee Report and Minutes (PDF 660KB)

Also on our website

Listed Buildings

Conservation

Town Hall, Bank Road
Matlock, Derbyshire DE4 3NN
01629 761 250 / 360
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